Switched to lubuntu


Farewell to ubuntu 10.04 and welcome lubuntu 12.04. Ubuntu served me well on my Asus Eee PC 901 but finally ubuntu became too bloated for 4GB SSD. Therefore I decided to give a try for lubuntu. So far it seems to work well. Although, I managed to break grub while installing. Fortunately I got it fixed soon with Boot Repair. Then there are some minor issues like not sure how well fancontrol works if it is working at all. On ubuntu 10.04 I had a marvelous eee-control taking care of fan and power saving, but now I do not have any idea how those tasks are taken care of on lubuntu. I also got very used to Netbook Remix desktop and now I'm back to traditional Gnome like desktop. I'm so called dump user, not interested on using command line and tweaking. If I can not do something easily from graphical interface, then I rather let it be. So, I just need to get used to what I now have. The most important thing is that I maybe managed to prolong the life of this Eee pc of mine with a year or two.

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16 thoughts on “Switched to lubuntu

  1. After Maverick I first tried Lubuntu. But then I switched to Crunchbang. :hat: .The whole Ubuntu family has strayed too far away from what I like about Linux. :awww: .What I loved about Crunchbang is that it's as if it was made just for me! :yes: .It uses vlc as it's default media player and the Open Box window manager (same wm as Lxde/Lubuntu)but no desktop as such.Still, for my usage, it's very easy to use and needed almost no tweaking at all. :hat: .the standard Ubuntu is way too bloated to run on anything less than top of the range machines in my opinion. :yuck:.

  2. Thank you for recommendations ๐Ÿ™‚ However, I think I will stick with lubuntu. Vlc player one can always install if needed. And I kind of trust on support of larger communities more than what some smaller ones offer. For example ubuntu communities somewhat tolerate peeps asking help on "formal members of ubuntu family".

  3. True that! :up::sst: although I generally find linuxquestions.org a better resource! :hat: .Having said that, the Crunchbang forums are quite friendly! And Corenominal is always floating around! :p .I actually had some issues with Lubuntu not being able to be shutdown from the power button! :awww: .I don't know if that bug has been fixed yet though.

  4. Thanks again Qlue :up: I have a look at Crunchbang and Archlinux suggested by Abhinav as well. One more reason to stick with lubuntu 12.04 is that it is probably LTS version like ubuntu 12.04, aka supported till year 2017. EDIT: Found out lubuntu 12.04 is not a LTS and supported only for 18 months. And now that they found new calendars by Mayas, the world seem to last a little longer after all :lol:Originally posted by qlue:

    I actually had some issues with Lubuntu not being able to be shutdown from the power button!

    I'm at work computer right now. So, can not test it. I always shut down from menu and therefore have not experienced this.

  5. Originally posted by serola:

    I always shut down from menu and therefore have not experienced this.

    I'm too lazy for that! ๐Ÿ˜† .

  6. I'm running Ubuntu 12.04 on a i7-2600 with 12 Gb of ram and runs fine, I revived my old desktop that runs at 1 Ghz with 1 Gb of ram and has Lubuntu 12.04 installed and runs fine. Although Ubuntu runs well in my i7 I prefer to use Lubuntu.

  7. I had difficulties to find any good screen capture tool for Lubuntu. At least on my Eee PC 901 no software was connected to 'PrtScn' button and even the most lightweight software I could find is way too complex and takes surprisingly lot of disk space :confused:

  8. I have been running Linux on my laptop for the past 5 years, mostly Ubuntu. When I upgraded to Ubuntu 11.10, I started having all sorts of problems. I hated Unity, and I even hated the new Gnome shell. Since I use Gimp a lot, one of its more frustrating features was the fact that placing any of my Gimp sub-windows near the top of my desktop would prompt the window manager to automatically maximize it — like I want my GIMP Layers window covering up my whole desktop. ๐Ÿ™„ Worse yet, my wifi had slowed to a crawl. I am assuming Ubuntu 11.10 nuked a proprietary driver. Eventually this was fixed by giving up on a software solution and buying a USB wifi stick. However before doing that I tried a variety of alternative, Ubuntu desktops. (Unity, Classic Gnome, LXDE, KDE). Then I started churning through other distros (Linux Mint with KDE and LXDE desktops; Linux Mint Debian edition), and finally Fedora 16. And it seemed like I had some significant issue with every single one. After using Fedora 16 for about a month, I'm rejecting that distro, too. Apparently when I installed Fedora, I mistakenly created two file systems (I had no idea it was doing this — the installation process seemed less clear than the Ubuntu installation process). So even though I have nearly 50GB available on my laptop's hard drive, now I can't upload a single photo from my camera because I'm told that file system is full where my Pictures folder is located. Rather than trying to fix the disk partitions, I'm planning on doing a fresh install of Ubuntu, so my disk will be completely wiped and I can start over.This hasn't been all that fun. ๐Ÿ˜ฆ In a week or so I am getting a used computer as a gift, and I plan on running Windows 7 on it.

  9. Originally posted by debplatt:

    Rather than trying to fix the disk partitions, I'm planning on doing a fresh install of Ubuntu, so my disk will be completely wiped and I can start over.

    I recommend that, and then stick with those Long Term Service distros like this latest Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin). They are usually more reliable and then you do not need to upgrade for several years.Originally posted by debplatt:

    one of its more frustrating features was the fact that placing any of my Gimp sub-windows near the top of my desktop would prompt the window manager to automatically maximize it

    Very strange :confused:Originally posted by debplatt:

    Worse yet, my wifi had slowed to a crawl.

    Even more strange :(If you decide to go for fresh install, I wish you luck :up:

  10. Originally posted by serola:

    I recommend that, and then stick with those Long Term Service distros like this latest Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin)

    +1The intermediate releases are like beta versions of the next lts release! :up: .Having said that, Debian squeeze is still the most stable distro. The only hassle being that it is not always compatible with the latest hardware as it uses an older kernel than the *buntu range and it's derivatives! :awww: .I use Crunchbang, which is Debian with Openbox instead of a full desktop. :up: .

  11. Well I did a clean install of Lubuntu on my laptop. I had a large number of distros on CD/DVD, and I chose Lubuntu 11.10 from my stack. Maybe I should have downloaded and burned the latest, but I didn't. So once 11.10 was all installed and I reached that point where I was about to update all my packages, a prompt came up saying, "Well, you could update all these 11.10 packages, but wouldn't you really rather upgrade your system to 12.04 LTS?" (maybe it was worded differently. ;)). So I agreed to let it upgrade my system.Upgrading to 12.04 seems to have mostly gone okay… except on the login screen I'm told I have a choice of desktops (Lubuntu, LXDE, Gnome/Openbox, Openbox, etc.). If I choose anything but Lubuntu, I'm tossed into a dark void where nothing ever happens (well that's true of all but LXDE, which tells me something has gone terribly wrong and that my system would like to report the terrible wrongness, but it doesn't know what to say).One of the first applications that I wanted to install was dropbox. When I tried running dropbox, it told me that something had gone wrong with the installation, and I was prompted to undo what I had done and get dropbox from Dropbox's official site. I tried that and that didn't work either. Then when I went back to Synaptic Package Manager, I found out that apparently trying to install dropbox caused some of the packages on my system to become broken. When I went to determine which packages were broken, one of the broken packages was synaptic and another was a library package that just about everything else depended upon. So I told Synaptic to please fix these broken packages (it did :up:), and I've given up on dropbox (which is a shame because I stored all my website passwords on dropbox in an encrypted file. I'll probably move this file to my box.com account, but I'll miss the auto-sync).Originally posted by serola:

    Very strange [about auto-maximizing windows]

    I believe the act of maximizing windows that the user has placed near the top of the desktop occurred under both Unity and the newest Gnome shell. It's possible that this was configurable and maybe I could have turned off this default behavior. But I was spending so much time trying to configure my desktop away from the default behavior that it soon became apparent that this just wasn't the right desktop for me. I like the simple Lubuntu/LXDE desktop. My biggest complaint would have to be not having an easy-to-use, graphical menu configuration tool.As to my wireless download speed, this winter I went from download speeds of around 13 or 15 Mbps to 1.1 Mpbs. It was very sad-making. I was watching empty rectangles in my browser gradually fill up with images. You can imagine what happened if I tried watching video. It was an unwelcome, nostalgic trip back to dial-up modem days.During the latest clean install I was using my USB Wireless stick to get all my packages from the Internet. Apparently since I wasn't using my laptop's built-in wifi during the installation process, it didn't even try to find a driver for it. If I pull the USB Wireless stick out, I no longer have any wifi capability at all.

  12. @Deb – If you had a large number of distros available, then why not Ubuntu 12.04 LTS? Or was that what you didn't have?I suggested to go for clean install of Ubuntu (not Lubuntu) 12.04, because I knew that kind of upgrade may not work ot fine.So, if you have enough disk space and possibility to burn Ubuntu 12.04 installer, then try that. Lubuntu I only recommend if you have very little disk space. And even with that it would be better have clean install directly to 12.04, not upgrading from 11.10.

  13. Originally posted by serola:

    And even with that it would be better have clean install directly to 12.04, not upgrading from 11.10.

    Yes, a clean install is a much safer plan. I always had problems upgrading from one release to the next, regardless of distro! :left: .

  14. Originally posted by debplatt:

    I suspect that users of more commercial systems (like Windows 7) don't spend nearly so much time trying to troubleshoot their OS.

    You are very right on that. Unfortunately Ubuntu family still does not come with easy solutions.Originally posted by debplatt:

    trying to replace their desktop with one that's more acceptable, and the one that was most acceptable was LXDE

    :doh: In that case maybe Lubuntu is maybe good for you. But again, get version 12.04. If you get it running, then on start menu you have option to start netbook desktop instead of traditional layout.

  15. I had burned something like 16 different distros to disk over the course of winter and spring as I tried out different ones. All the ones related to Ubuntu (Ubuntu/Kubuntu/Xbuntu/Lubuntu) were from the 11.04 release. Perhaps I should have downloaded the latest and burned it, too, but I had just intended on reverting to a previously tried version (Lubuntu 11.10) and then succumbed to the temptation to upgrade when prompted. Since this was an upgrade that was happening while I was installing the O.S. I thought it might be different and more dependable than one that happens on an existing system via the update manager.If I were to go back to Ubuntu, I'd be back to trying to replace their desktop with one that's more acceptable, and the one that was most acceptable was LXDE. So I thought that it made sense to just install Lubuntu since that was its default desktop rather than trying to plaster LXDE on top of Ubuntu (I tried that and I got a horribly complicated menu that I couldn't edit; by starting out with LXDE I get a normal looking menu. Of course I still can't edit it, but it doesn't seem as much in need of editing).I suspected that the Dropbox issues were related to Ubuntu 12.04 itself and not my particular flavor of it. (Dropbox did work with the 11.10 version of Ubuntu). I didn't look into why it wasn't working at the time, but it does appear to be an Ubuntu issue (http://forums.dropbox.com/topic.php?id=59808). People at this forum are suggesting workarounds.But that's kind of the gist of it for me. I'm tired of doing troubleshooting and workarounds. Many times I've been able to uncover solutions to my technical issues, but there have been other times that I've invested a lot of time trying to get something to work without ever succeeding. It could be like that expression that "The grass is greener on the other side of the fence," but I suspect that users of more commercial systems (like Windows 7) don't spend nearly so much time trying to troubleshoot their OS. But maybe I'm wrong about that. I'll be getting a used computer later this week (it's a cast-off from Bob's employer), so I can compare the two system.

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